The Increasing Diversity by Increasing Access (IDIA) to legal education initiative placed eight scholars – four in NLU Orissa, three in NLU Jodhpur and one in GNLU Gandhinagar – out of the 24 scholars it had trained for the Common Law Admission Test (CLAT) 2014.

Among those placed there are three visually impaired scholars, the son of a stenographer in Amarchand Mangaldas, and a second-time CLAT taker (now placed in NLU Orissa) who took admission in Calcutta University’s department of law last year.

None of the national law universities (NLU) the IDIA scholars won admission to presently grant scholarships (only NLSIU Bangalore, NLU Delhi and NUJS Kolkata presently offer such scholarships), but donors pledged to fund four IDIA scholars’ entire five-year legal education in its recent annual conference held in Delhi. For the remaining four scholars, at Rs 3 lakh per year, IDIA still needs to raise Rs 60 lakh.

Two more scholars made the cut for Nirma Institute of Law, which uses CLAT scores and is considering scholarships.

Eight IDIA scholars made it past the first CLAT list last year too, but the scholar batch size was bigger at 39.

Successful scholar profiles

IDIA Harvest of 2014

 

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Like +5 Object -2 Ignoramus 07 Jul 14, 19:59
After seeing the futile but sincere efforts put in by IDIA volunteers in respect of one such IDIA scholar through one semester of a national law university, I for one, seriously doubt the viability of this exercise. As a symbolic initiative, IDIA is a success. But practically speaking it is unlikely to make a real difference to its scholars. The money could be more beneficially utilized if IDIA looks for equally good but lesser fee demanding law colleges. The ridiculously high fee structure of national law universities does not necessarily equate itself to a proportionate hike in quality of legal education. Of course, the alumni matters in getting placements and the peer group in the best institutions brings out the best in most students. But the high peer pressure itself is also the undoing for those who do not have the benefit of a strong academic, social, economic, intellectual and family support structure.
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Like +1 Object -0 ignorance is bliss 08 Jul 14, 19:58
Great points. But where would you put your brother or sister in? Or your son or daughter? Would you put them into the NLU's to maximise their job opportunity and learning or the other older law schools with not so good prospects? Why should we send poorer kids to third tier colleges?
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Like +3 Object -1 Delhi lawyer 08 Jul 14, 16:04
Why should anyone be funded for studying at Nirma? If money is an issue, go to Delhi University.
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Like +0 Object -0 Logic 08 Jul 14, 19:58
Nirma is considering a fee waiver as the article notes. Perhaps thats why!
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Like +0 Object -0 Delhi lawyer 10 Jul 14, 17:50
Yes, but they are only considering.

First, you will surely appreciate that matters tend to remain "under consideration" indefinitely in this country. Second, my specific question was why should anyone be funded. In other words, IDEA should not use donations to fund anyone's study at Nirma, since DU, GLC, etc. are cheaper options. Your response is not the answer to my question; rather, it answers why Nirma finds a mention in a story on IDEA/ scholarships/ funding.
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Like +0 Object -0 kianganz 10 Jul 14, 19:14
Update: Apparently Nirma has confirmed 3 (!) scholarships for IDIA students.
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