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An estimated 5-minute read

The WORD(s) is not enough...

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At the (almost) end of my law school, when I look back, I found how things have changed. Some words, that were alien, or had different meaning, becomes inseparable like soulmate. You live with these words, sleep with them, eat with them and they keep stalking you even after you graduate.

 

Here is a small part of that law school dictionary:

1.       Moot Court (noun) : The most over-hyped thing in law school. Also known as cupid or matchmaker for hitching the oralist-oralist, oralist-researcher, researcher-researcher. 

Annotation
: Moots is like a Karan Johar's movies- it starts with expectations, excitement and happy-happy faces. By the time it finishes first quarter, you feel burdened and want to run-away. When its the interval or half-time, you start getting irritated and ego-clashes, tensions start building up between team mates (read:family) . By the time it ends, you feel like killing yourself for wasting time and money and wow never to do that again. But like a witch it catches you next semester by allurements like a hot moot partner or chance to holiday in paris, hong kong, vienna or a sparkling achievement in CV. 

 

2.     Sutta (noun) : a roll that sets many things straight.


Annotation: If there is one thing which works like a common thread, a link between all law students across different law schools is- sutta. Its like a best friend, it helps you in exams, getting over a bad break-up, stressbuster, a great way to make buddies and also makes you learn the importance of sharing. A law school is indeed incomplete without this tiny little support system.

  

3.      Fanti (noun): a very rare species which if found, results in sudden increase in expenses and decrease in happiness. Also known as "setting" or "item". 


Annotation: Just a piece of advice: it might be highly rewarding and lucrative to have one but stay away from such dangerous things if you want to live independent in independent India.


4.      Internship (noun): a period during which law students slog their a**es with hopes to get a placement with the best firms of country. Also known as "booze period" or "clubbing period" for law students from dry state in India. 


Annotation:  A word which is an alien thing till your school, becomes a haunting reality the moment you step into a Law School. It becomes a scale to judge how a person is and thats cos "the more, the merrier" is the motto and in this case, size does matters.

  

5.       CCP (verb) : a pure display of one's art.


Annotation:
Undoubtedly, CTRL+X, CTRL+C and CTRL+V are the most used keys by a law student. It takes hours of hardwork and zeal to master the art so that you can easily bypass any anti-piracy software of the law school. Moreover, it requires awesome formatting skills to give it such a makeover that it looks better then the original.  

 

6.      Jugaad (noun) : A great tool. Works like a midas touch if used smartly and at appropriate time. 

Annotation: Everyone knows what it is. Those who have this, want to use it as much as they can. And those who don't have it, either curses their parents for not making any connections or just use sutta to get over the jealousy. 
 

 

7.       Gymnesia (verb): a state of complete insanity wherein a person dreams to get six packs and hulk-wolverine type "body" but ends up looking like a trolley-pulling labourer.  

Annotation: Gymming is good, gymming is healthy but dont be a freak about it. I mean, if you really want to get a good physique, go for it. But don't just buy all the supplements, Reebok shoes, Addidas gear when you know you will quit it in a week and play C.S. (defined below) in your bed wearing the same gear. 
 

 

8.      Bhai (adj.): used variedly and vividly like in case of need, to show affection, to make sure a guy stop hitting on you or to differentiate between "friends" and "best friends.
Annotation
: The guys get the credit for evolving this term which is most widely used not just in law schools but most of the colleges. The reason: movies like Kal ho na ho and Dostana which left a doubt that 2 guys can be more then just friends. So its better to refer your friend as bhai and shave all raising eyebrows. Its also useful when you need stuff like "ek sutta de de yaar, tu hi toh bhai hai"- see, one word, so many uses.
 

 

9.      C.S. (noun): a gift of science to have a transition from "nerd herd" to "dude gang"...and vice versa.

Annotation:  "Need is mother of invention". In this case, need of both mother and father led to this invention. Every parent has complaints from their kids. Parents of geeks, want them to become smart dudes and parents of dudes want them to be a little geeky atleast. And that led to C.S. (Counter Strike). Its simple: if you stay glued to your laptop for hours, you will need glasses after a while- hence you get the geeky look. Similarly, if you are a nerd, but awesome in C.S., you become a dude. What an amazing dual purpose game!!
 

 

10.   Dassu (adj.) : used to describe a rare quality although being communicable its spreading at fast rate.

 

Annotation: People of this species are also known as "pakau" "bugger" or "saanp". Some people master the art of bugging. And more interestingly, the mode. Some crib a lot, some talk, some just sit next to you and use their body language. Fascinatingly, a dassu never comes to know that he is one or that he daso-fy people until he is made aware of the fact. More dangerous species then fanti.  

Thats all folks. Thank you for reading it till here and take sigh of relief cos this is the end part. I mean, where the bad post ends. Like culmination. okay, thats it.

 

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