Shorts: Too sexy for NLS?Shorts: Too sexy for NLS?

NLSIU Bangalore professor V Nagaraj allegedly shamed a student on Monday for wearing shorts to his lecture, and allegedly cast aspersions on the student’s character when she objected to the statements of the professor over her attire.

In protest, the entire third-year LLB class attended Nagaraj’s lecture wearing shorts this morning: the class stood up in protest, demanding an apology from Nagaraj; the professor refused to apologise, confirmed sources in the class, and the lecture did not take place.

Nagaraj denied any wrongdoing when contacted by Legally India but said he expected decorum in students’ dress sense (see below).

According to a “statement of condemnation” with allegations by third-year students, emailed to the vice chancellor, all faculty members, the exam department and all law students:

As many students of the III year batch of B.A., LL.B. (Hons.), NLSIU, we issue this statement strongly condemning the extremely shameful incident in which a Professor has made inappropriate remarks to a III year student in our presence.

We are extremely aggrieved about the fact that:

a. The Professor publicly shamed the student for the clothes she chose to wear, and

b. The Professor cast aspersions on the students character for voicing her concerns.

The incident under protest is as follows:

The student in question, like various other students, had worn shorts to class. On noticing the shorts, the said Professor chastised the student before the entire class by asking her to “dress properly.” The student was deeply uncomfortable with the remark, as were many of us, since we do not think it is correct for a teacher to impose his/her notions about appropriate clothing upon the students. The student in question, who was scolded by the said Professor, thought it necessary to further discuss the matter with him and not to overlook it as another instance of moral policing. Upon approaching the teacher and raising objections regarding his statement, the student, to our dismay, was again rebuked by the Professor and was exposed to a plethora of untoward comments.

In the presence of many of us, the Professor went to the extent of drawing an extremely distasteful analogy as to why the student should not wear shorts and said, “We all know why parents marry their children off - so that they can have sex. Just because the parents marry off their children for this reason, it does not mean that the children have sex in front of their parents.”

Needless to add, we were all stunned into silence on hearing a distinguished member of the faculty make such a crude comment. The student was appalled at this reasoning and respectfully objected to the same. The Professor then proceeded to cast aspersions on the character of the student. He denounced her credibility entirely and went on to state,“You can come to class without a dress also. That is how your character is, I’m going to ignore you.”

This incident left the student in an uncomfortable position with her character being called into question by the said Professor because she attempted to question his method of public censure. As a consequence of this incident, the student has been extremely aggreived and has asked the Vice-Chancellor to look into the matter and we hope that action will be taken by him against the said Professor.

We find such behaviour extremely unacceptable, especially coming from a Professor, who students are expected to consider as a role model. NLS has taught us to value discourse above everything else and to be tolerant of individual choices. The behaviour highlighted above goes against the spirit of this institution. Therefore, we believe it is imperative that such aberrant actions be denounced by the University as a whole with immediate effect. We also demand that a public apology be issued by the teacher in question to the concerned student and the institution as a whole.

In solidarity with the concerned student, and as a mark of protest against the Professor, we choose to exercise our right to personal expression and comfort by wearing shorts to the class of the concerned Professor. However, we would like to clarify that this statement is not merely against moral policing, but also, in particular, against the derogatory remarks made by the Professor.”

When contacted by Legally India, Nagaraj commented: “Nothing like [what is described in the statement] happened. Students are making false and baseless allegations. It is for the university authorities to examine this incident. This is the first time that students have made such a statement [whereas] I have been teaching for 27 years.”

“I had already informed the vice chancellor and the registrar, by email, when the incident happened on Monday. Then I reminded them on phone. But the VC is out of station and the university has taken no action so far so it has become a free for all,” he added.

Nagaraj told Legally India that there was no written dress code for students in NLSIU’s rules currently but he has asked the university administration to issue clarifications about the dress code to the students, especially keeping in mind that “certain decorum” is expected from students attending lectures taken “especially by a senior faculty member”.

NLSIU vice chancellor Prof Venkat Rao was not reachable for comment by phone at the time of going to press.

The NLSIU sexual harassment committee’s former in-charge, Prof VS Elizabeth, replied to the statement and all addressees via email:

As someone who has been guilty of having reprimanded at least one woman student in the past and then brought to realise how sexist my attitude had been, by the batch of 2017, I must say that it is important that all of us, particularly, faculty should think before we make comments, particularly should not be casting aspersions on people's character based on what they wear or don't wear.  After all the amount of cloth we use to cover our bodies does not proportionately reflect our morality.  Many sexual abusers of children and women most certainly wear more clothes, does it mean that they are more moral than the rest of us? 

I realised during the classroom discussion that took place, at least two years ago, that the problem was with my attitude and not with the young woman who wore those micro mini shorts.

I have never liked my colleagues' comments about what I wear or don't wear and have always opposed any dress code being imposed on the faculty, though there have been colleagues who wished to do so.  I am really sorry that one of my colleagues said things that are unwarranted and caused pain to one of the students.

This sort of thing should not happen in an institution like ours.

UPDATE: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that the vice chancellor has responded to the complaint on general email addressed to everyone who recieved the original email from the students.

Photo by Alan Patrick

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1
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Like +12 Object -22 Guest 06 Apr 16, 16:00  controversial
It's my right. If I want to go to a lecture in chaddi, I should be allowed. If I go bottomless, I should then be allowed to. Arrest me under Section 292 but let me attend the lecture. Yay!
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2
Like +41 Object -5 Batch of 08 06 Apr 16, 16:11  interesting  top rated  controversial
Lol - so much for 'Sympathy, Yumpathy and Jenineness' :-)
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Like +34 Object -34 FYI 06 Apr 16, 16:15  controversial
Students should behave appropriately. Not everything can be permitted under the guise of being rebellious.
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3.1
Like +11 Object -4 NLS Alum 07 Apr 16, 08:52  interesting
Clothing is the least relevant part of appropriateness in an academic context. If they were, we would all have been giving exams in robes a la Oxbridge and Hogwarts. It's even less relevant in today's professional contexts, when most people never wear suits. So what's the point of hanging on to antiquated notions of appropriateness in clothing as a prerequisite to learning?
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3.1.1
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Like +0 Object -0 Layra 12 Apr 16, 01:18
Even in Oxbridge, the robe-to-exams may be tradition, but nobody questions a student wearing shorts to a college lecture, no matter how distinguished the faculty is.
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3.2
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Like +4 Object -2 Re:FYI 08 Apr 16, 10:44
The mere fact that you perceive a person's choice of clothing as inappropriate does not make it objectively inappropriate. Also, did it occur to that tiny brain of yours, that most students wear what they wear, because they find it comfortable, and not just to "rebel"? Food for thought. Get over yourself.
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3.3
Like +6 Object -1 Common Sense 08 Apr 16, 17:06  interesting
You idiot. Its not about whether she wore shorts, it is about whether it is fair to call her characterless as a result of her clothing.
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Like +0 Object -0 Common Sense 08 Apr 16, 17:07
Sir, it is not about whether she dressed appropriately, it is about whether it was fair to call her 'characterless' because she wore shorts.
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Like +36 Object -9 Lizzie 06 Apr 16, 16:16  interesting  top rated  controversial
Got to love Lizzie :-)

And well done to the kids, standing up for their batchmate like that. Similar to a previous protest where most of the women on campus stood outside the Vice-Chancellor's office in salwar-kameez-dupattas in order to protest his comments regarding their clothes getting them eve-teased in Nagarbhavi.

These sorts of things really ought not to be said at Law School. It's antithetical to everything taught there.

The story has gone viral on the alumni threads, so hopefully RVR will be forced to do something, and at least extract an apology
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5
Like +14 Object -4 Flying Kharbanda 06 Apr 16, 16:28  interesting
Wasn't this Nagaraj fellow effectively thrown out of NLU-Orissa? Venkata Rao shouldn't just accept [...] like this. The Alumni groups are burning up.
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5.1
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Like +1 Object -0 Common Sense 08 Apr 16, 17:08
I love that drink.

And yes, he was thrown out of NLIUO.
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Like +23 Object -3 Lizzie Boi 06 Apr 16, 16:36  interesting  top rated
On a slightly unrelated note, what are "micro mini shorts"? Lizzie never ceases to entertain.
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Like +17 Object -25 FYI 06 Apr 16, 16:42  controversial
Students should not wear shorts in class. They should maintain decorum.
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7.1
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Like +3 Object -4 Vent 07 Apr 16, 17:46
Agreed. But there is a way a professor should address the issue rather than shaming that person!!
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Like +2 Object -2 FYI-is-a-moron 08 Apr 16, 10:47
What does wearing shorts and maintaining decorum have anything to do with the other? Clothes do not objectify women. People objectify them, on the basis of clothes. There's nothing intrinsically morally reprehensible in any article of clothing. Get your head out of your ass.
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Like +19 Object -29 Batchmate 06 Apr 16, 16:49  controversial
I understand no one can ask or judge someone what he or she should wear. But a decorum is a decorum. Then I wont be surprised that later when these students will become lawyer, they may turn up in sorts in Supreme Court also and will say this is my right. I agree, one should not be stopped from wearing anything, that why we have two institutions to learn- one is home, where you can wear what you want and a college - where some decorum is expected. Just because we all are grown up, that does not give us a right to whatever we want. Wear whatever you want to wear and walk on road no one will object to it but maintain a decorum for few places. I think then this student should have objected these dress thin even in school and should have gone in shorts BUT no guts that time. Howe does a right get changed when you have grown up..... Think before you all act..
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8.1
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Like +9 Object -8 anonymouse 06 Apr 16, 17:18  controversial
namaste to your DECORUM, saar.
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Like +4 Object -6 anonymouse 06 Apr 16, 17:19
LOL, why don't you start practicing and go to SC in formals+blazer+gown? Then you'll wish for shorts.
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8.3
Like +41 Object -7 Bored Graduate 06 Apr 16, 17:44  interesting  top rated  controversial
I don't know where in the NLSIU rulebook do you get the requirement of a dress code? The student did not show up to class nude or in undergarments. The issue of a dress code is anyways secondary, the actual issue is the slut shaming and the misogyny in the reprimands of the Professor. By asserting that a woman is sexually promiscuous because of the length of her shorts, the Professor has crossed all boundaries.

I sincerely hope you are not an actual student at NLSIU, because the level of argument is atrocious and furthermore the amount of whataboutery and Straw Man, makes my head hurt. Get a proper education and don't waste your time in law school.
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8.3.1
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Like +5 Object -2 To the bored Graduate 06 Apr 16, 18:46
He's definitely not a batchmate of ours. :P
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8.4
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Like +9 Object -11 Response to Batchmate 06 Apr 16, 18:53  controversial
Mr. Batchmate, i sincerely hope your legal reasoning improves in your remaining time in Law School, however long or short that might be. Let me respond to your last throw away line, "Howe does a right get changed when you have grown up". When you are a child you have limited rights, legally you are not considered to be responsible for your actions, therefore, schools, parents etc. do have the right and the authority to tell you what to do and what to wear. Further most school's have UNIFORMS and not dress codes. So if my school uniform is a pair of shorts, i cant wear pants even if i want to. Now when i become an adult (i.e. 18 or above) i no longer have anyone else responsible for my actions. The law presumes that i know what im doing, and i have to take responsibility for it. Which is why people dont want to be told what to do and what to wear once they have become adults. The concept of the consenting adult, read up on it. Therefore, once we grow up and earn our own money and can provide for ourself, we can very well do exactly what we want as long as it is not against the LAW.
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Like +36 Object -1 Alum 06 Apr 16, 17:05  interesting  top rated
Proud of my juniors. Nagaraj is known to have misused his (then) position as Registrar and call parents of girls and cast similar aspersions. Imagine having your parents hear this!

Why doesn't she SHARIC him? (For non-NLS, this is the Sexual Harassment code). His comments are sufficient ground.
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9.1
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Like +3 Object -1 N-hater 06 Apr 16, 18:52
Sharic is useless. More torture for the girl and just a whack on the hand for the perpetrator (if after years of torture she manages to get a verdict).
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Like +11 Object -3 Change with the times 06 Apr 16, 17:18  interesting
Even court mandated clothes change to accomodate considerations such as heat. Also, in court you need advocates dressed a certain way to identify them. In college there is NO rational nexus with this. If shorts disturb the decorum because they "disturb" either students or professors, then quite frankly the students or professors in question can be sent back.
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10.1
Like +26 Object -0 Haha 06 Apr 16, 17:25  interesting  top rated
So I understand that the protest is against the things he said to the girl, not the fact that he objected to shorts as a matter of decorum. If you believe that people shouldn't wear shorts in college, have an official circular to that effect, and stop telling kids that they have no character because they wear shorts.
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10.1.1
Like +9 Object -0 Change with the times 06 Apr 16, 17:38  interesting
I get that that is what this particular protest says, but dress codes (there is a big debate in the US about this, you can look it up) often reflect inherently sexist assumptions. Both in terms of content (dress codes tend to be more restrictive of women) and in their conception (because how else do you justify shorts or a lack thereof affecting anything that happens in a classroom?)
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10.1.1.1
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Like +2 Object -1 Haha 06 Apr 16, 18:02
Agree fully, my argument was an even if. I don't believe that there should be any dress codes generally.
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10.1.1.2
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Like +1 Object -0 I agree 08 Apr 16, 10:53
I agree. The whole concept of "dress-codes" and their perceived appropriateness presupposes that women are chattel, whose sexuality ought to be controlled. The blatant and unabashed misogyny exhibited by Nagraj is nauseating. No person, much less a professor, ought to behave this way with any student. It is ironic that teachers like him expect any respect. A "senior" professor ought to behave in a manner commensurate with his stature, and not air out his chauvinist beliefs in the way he did.
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11
Like +10 Object -0 Surya Chandrashekhar 06 Apr 16, 17:53  interesting
LI/Kian: Please don't let up on this. University admin often have the "out of station", "on leave", "sick leave" excuse on hand whenever something controversial occurs. Please contact/obtain a comment from VC/Registrar on the course of action on this issue, if any that they seek to order.
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12
Like +25 Object -3 LawSchoolite 06 Apr 16, 18:35  interesting  top rated
Immensely in awe of this batch, for standing in solidarity with a batchmate and not hesitating to show the University to practice the ideals they stand for. Nothing can better express the attitude of the student body unites to call out patriarchy when they see it. And good old Lizzie. Reason over conditioned precepts, as always.
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Like +4 Object -1 LawSchoolite 06 Apr 16, 19:59
*which unites, apologies

Also, the the scamster under the name "Batchmate", those concerns have been discussed as well. We do not talk about our right to nudity. Please read closely. We condemn characterization and slut shaming based on attire.
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13
Like +14 Object -1 Smriti I 06 Apr 16, 19:40  interesting  top rated
Does NLSIU fly the national flag? At 203 m?
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13.1
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Like +2 Object -0 Guest 07 Apr 16, 13:17
No. They wear bottoms at three feet.
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14
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Like +5 Object -20 Time to Change 06 Apr 16, 19:44  controversial
So now its NLSIU on dress after JNU on "Khannya Episode". What do we want full anarchy in the disguise of freedom. We always compare ourselves with the Western culture but always forget the situation, their culture, their society, their upbringing WHICH is not as ours....do go and ask for change but with some rationalae to it...
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14.1
Like +12 Object -1 Change with the times 06 Apr 16, 22:19  interesting
Bro. My culture, where women have proudly worn saris that exposed their stomachs and walked without blouses, has in fact been tainted by Victorian ideals of modesty. If you want to talk about Indian culture at least educate yourself about what men and women in India have actually worn in the past (and not just upper caste women and men).
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14.1.1
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Like +0 Object -0 yeah 10 Apr 16, 13:34
I for one still roam around in revealing boxers...does that make me a loose character person? Hmmm...I think it kindaa does..:( but hey if it helps my thing doesn't get erect even at the sight of a beautiful girl in a mini skirt...

Full Disclosure: I dont have any medical problems.
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14.2
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Like +2 Object -0 Bored Graduate 07 Apr 16, 10:31
Don't know about what they do now Ma'am, but in the good old days, I used to fly the Jolly Roger, outside Ganga Hostel! Just like ze Ganga Dhaba it was a place for debauchery and all sorts of other activities that would shock and offend the fuddy duddies, who claim to know best!
However, this process managed to create rather patriotic, educated and well rounded citizens. So respectfully let us fly the Pirate Flag!!
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Like +4 Object -11 Hmm 06 Apr 16, 20:02
Guys, cut some slack to the poor prof, will you. at least he aint pervert enough like many who do stare at naked women. he simply ignores naked women - isnt that a hard prof to find in a country like ours? btw,i would have loved much if the batch showed up naked (instead of shorts) for a headline news and larger public attention to this damn thing called a dress code.
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15.1
Like +6 Object -1 Nope 06 Apr 16, 20:22  interesting
"15 Hmm" Are you blind? Read again and you'll know the true reason behind his condemnation. And the analogy used by him is a shame for a teacher at an institution which basically teaches one how to argue. i could eat a bowl of alphabet soup and s**t out a better argument than that. Truly shameful. Good job 3rd years!
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15.2
Like +6 Object -1 Change with the times 06 Apr 16, 22:20  interesting
By the way, not being a pervert is not a standard but a basic requirement. As is the decency to not make moral aspersions on students based on their clothes.
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Like +5 Object -23 Snitch 06 Apr 16, 20:13  controversial
Obviously one will be compelled to cast aspersions if someone dresses up in revealing clothes. The kind of way you present yourself reflects your character. Our value system does not permit wearing indecent clothes.
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16.1
Like +37 Object -2 Change with the times 06 Apr 16, 22:21  interesting  top rated
I'm so glad my character resides in my clothes for you. Yours resides in your words for me, and trust me it isn't doing so well.
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Like +5 Object -27 Eagle 06 Apr 16, 20:16  troll?  controversial
The girl should apologise for anarchist behaviour or disciplinary action should be taken.

First FTII then Hyderabad University, then JNU and now NLS. We can't allow such jokers to hold educational institutions to ransom.
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Like +9 Object -21 Senior Counsel 06 Apr 16, 20:17  controversial
Naxalites should not be allowed to hijack our educational institutes.
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18.1
Like +13 Object -1 NLS Alum 07 Apr 16, 08:57  interesting  top rated
Neither should narrow minded misogynists.
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Like +3 Object -6 Coincidence 06 Apr 16, 20:59
What a coincidence!! Heard this song on FM 104 this morning and its stuck in my head:

"Jungle Jungle baat chali hai pata chala hai..
Arre chaddi pehen ke phool khila hai phool khila hai"
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20
Like +7 Object -2 Lol 06 Apr 16, 21:32  interesting
i hope these last comments are sarcasm and not the real views of ACTUAL PEOPLE. Because it would be embarrassing to know that these parochial beings exist in the same society that i do. xD
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20.1
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Like +4 Object -2 Change with the times 06 Apr 16, 22:22
I took a few of them seriously but as I continued reading I came to the conclusion/hope that these were just trolls.
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20.1.1
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Like +1 Object -0 Sadlife 08 Apr 16, 10:57
True. Though, I suspect - that they're the same person just pasting the same drivel in differing iterations. If only there was a time-machine - these deluded lunatics could go the hell back to Victorian England, and stay there.
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21
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Like +3 Object -0 Nome 06 Apr 16, 22:19
Unfortunate that this news is on the same day as Ashwath's move. This doesn't seem to be getting the requisite attention. This is a huge story symptomatic of the attitude in law schools. Kian- please don't take this off the top item on your page for a while.
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21.1
Like +7 Object -1 kianganz 06 Apr 16, 22:26  interesting
Don't worry, both stories are getting read - this one may soon overtake the total hits on the Ashwath story.
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Like +5 Object -14 Shekhar Gehlot 07 Apr 16, 00:35  controversial
I don't support what professor said in class that's not acceptable but I equally feel sad over the manner in which retaliation has taken place. We students hold teachers in highest regard and condemn the behaviour of this class. Sometimes ug students at nlsiu are very disrespectful.
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22.1
Like +7 Object -2 ugstudents 07 Apr 16, 03:26  interesting
.........and the Lallam strikes again.
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22.2
Like +7 Object -3 NLS Alum 07 Apr 16, 08:59
They have followed all appropriate procedures in making their complaints heard and when that didn't work, they've made the issue public, and that too reluctantly. If that's disrespectful, I wish more people were disrespectful in such a logical and rational manner.
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Like +5 Object -13 Shekhar Gehlot 07 Apr 16, 00:37  controversial
professor said he's open to any enquiry. They could have lodged a complaint against him in SHARIC or to VC or to any other concerned authority. M not shielding him, but yaa when he's denying having said that then let enquiry happen. Where are PNJs. You are revealing everything he said and forming an opinion against him, fine, but atleast allow him an explanation too. Anybody can be cornered like this tomorrow, especially when he cannot defend as freely as we students can offend. If he's guilty take a course which is right. To undo a wrong one cannot do another wrong. This is my understanding, may not be matching yours, but isn't it ok to have divergent views?
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23.1
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Like +6 Object -3 But. 07 Apr 16, 09:06
It's good that you have faith in the system of enquiry inter alia, but do you not see that this incident has grossly violated our culture, and rights? A little research will show similar forms of protest at Nalsar. Enquiries may take time, with uncertain verdict and little attention.
This is not a private affair. It's a unanimous show of support, a declaration that Law School is a safe space. Your character is judged by your deeds and achievements, not looks.

Plus, there is no better way to honour our professors than by practicing what they preach - don't accept injustice.
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23.2
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Like +4 Object -2 Faff 07 Apr 16, 09:19
Do read the article, where the Prof denies any such thing happened, despite 80 witnesses:

When contacted by Legally India, Nagaraj commented: “Nothing like [what is described in the statement] happened. Students are making false and baseless allegations. It is for the university authorities to examine this incident. This is the first time that students have made such a statement [whereas] I have been teaching for 27 years.”

Do read and understand that the university authorities already know of the incident and are ignoring it.

“I had already informed the vice chancellor and the registrar, by email, when the incident happened on Monday. Then I reminded them on phone. But the VC is out of station and the university has taken no action so far so it has become a free for all,” he added.


Maybe the student doesn't want to lodge a formal complaint which could have worse consequences for the professor. At most, it would've involved a forced apology. That is her prerogative. It could've been resolved with an apology, no? The decision not to teach was solely the prof's.
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24
Like +8 Object -1 Told You So 07 Apr 16, 08:48  interesting
What else can one expect with this [...] vice chancellor and [...] registrar and all the old seniles hes stuffing the place with.

Let me start a movement named

HUTT VENKATT !
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24.1
Like +9 Object -0 Inexplicable 07 Apr 16, 19:04  interesting
This will sound like 'whataboutery' but please highlight the fact that NLSIU has not recruited faculty members to permanent positions in many years. The last round of regular recruitments happened in 2006 and everybody since then has been appointed in ad-hoc, visiting or adjunct positions. This is a deliberate ploy on part of the present administration to keep competent teachers out. The few who do join are either fired or forced to leave on specious grounds. Remember Sidharth Chauhan's in limine termination in February 2013. Compare what he said in the context of the gendered impact of curfews with what Prof. V. Nagraj has said this week. Who is better suited to shape the future of the institution? I hope that current students will also call out the abject populism of the present administration which distracts attention away from abysmal teaching standards.
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Like +9 Object -21 Sourav Singh 07 Apr 16, 10:33  controversial
First, I support the professor in his concern that students should follow basic discipline and etiquette when attending lectures. Imagine if the professor starts coming in shorts and vests to teach?!!
Secondly, due to advent of feminism, which is slowly becoming the root cause of all this rebellious attitude among girls, we have seen in them a desire to break all norms and decorum. And to defend that, they will go to the extent of making false allegations on people to create an issue. I am quite sure that the professor said not much more than objecting to her dressing sense during the lecture and it has been blown out of proportion.
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25.1
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Like +3 Object -18 Sourav Singh 07 Apr 16, 11:11
Also, a third point. My statement might hurt some people who are of the rebellious kind. I do not blame them. They were not told where they are going wrong when this indiscipline could have been stopped.
Now, it is the era of rebels and indiscipline mongers. Thus, I can only have sympathy for those who dislike my comment without having any deep analysis of the issue in hand.
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25.2
Like +14 Object -2 Anagram 07 Apr 16, 11:44  interesting  top rated
Hello friend. Are you quite sure that is what the professor said? Are you absolutely sure? Are you, for instance indicating that you have first hand information about the entire incident which the batch itself is not aware of?
"The advent of feminism" has made women rebellious and I agree. Except for some reason you assume that such rebellion is a bad thing. When a rebellion does occur, it occurs because the dominant regime governing the rebels is considered unjust. In this case, the "rebellion" happens to be against the patriarchal notions of morality that fuels the professor's inappropriate remarks regarding the student's character. Regardless of the presence of a fabled dress code in the campus and her being in violation of the same, nothing justifies the making of such remarks and questioning the'character' of the girl based on her choice of clothes. The appropriate punishment (again, hypothetical) could have been to simply send her out of the class or something like that.
And haha, if you are going to say that feminism is a movement limited to women alone, I pity your grasp on the premises which form your argument in the first place. And FYI, there have been multiple complaints from male students against the concerned professor. Just not in an institutional manner.
Cheers.
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25.3
Like +9 Object -2 NLS V Year 07 Apr 16, 11:53  interesting
I won't even bother to respond to your feminism claim. But when you say you believe the professor said "not much more" and this has been blown out of proportion, think about the optics for a bit. A batch of 80+ students - whose grades and medals are very much dependent on this professor - is testifying to the allegations made in the statement. In case you are paying credence to the professor's quote in this article, where he says that this is the first time students are making such a statement whereas he has been teaching for 27 years, I'd like to related some anecdotes to you - the broader NLS community (current undergrads and alumni) who have been taught by this professor can also attest to his proclivity to make statements of this sort. Nagaraj has in the past hauled up not only women for wearing shorts, but also men (and has made them sit on the floor as punishment, etc). He asked a female batchmate of mine - outside class - whether her parents know what sort of activities she's engaging in the college they pay for her to attend, because she was wearing shorts.
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Like +7 Object -2 anonymouse 07 Apr 16, 11:56  interesting
I'm sorry that my "feminism" is causing you so much discomfort, shall retreat forthwith to the kitchen to perfect the fluffiness of my rice and the roundness of my roti. My mistake, to confuse basic freedom to wear what I want with "rebellion".
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Like +9 Object -1 NLS Alum 07 Apr 16, 12:17  interesting
Now if only we could chain women to the kitchen stove again and put them in ghoonghat. It's so troublesome to have them running around colleges and workplaces. There was so much more norms and decorum when it was only men and we could treat women as irrelevant. The good old days eh Sourav Singh? See! I'm capable of deep analysis too!
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Like +4 Object -1 Shorts 07 Apr 16, 12:01
Its sad this whole episode was about naming and shaming, some profs are conservative and this could have ideally been handed by him requesting her not wear shorts! Again it's no ideal to tell a person what to wear but we live in a world of give and takes. It's great that the class stood up for her and hopefully a more rational approach can sort out the issue rather than anymore unwarranted comments.

Peace out
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Like +2 Object -5 Hyper concerned lawboi 07 Apr 16, 12:19
You see some time back a professor made insulted me infront of everyone in a gratuitous manner and I felt the rage that this girl feels. But then I MANNED UP, said sorry to him and spent the rest of my dayz pondering over what I did wrong. I finally came to the conclusion that Teachers can do no wrong and since then I hae loved that teacher, though it is one sided but who cares, You gotta repect the authority or who will take care of a manchild like me.
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Like +2 Object -9 Guest 07 Apr 16, 18:14
Are these 'legal luminaries in the making almost adults' planning to wear shorts to their fancy jobs at fancy law firms also.
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Like +9 Object -2 Not a Guest 07 Apr 16, 18:46  interesting
So should they wear suits and come to class? I assume you lot wouldn't have a problem if they wore jeans. So then are these 'legal luminaries in the making almost adults' planning on wearing jeans to their fancy jobs at fancy law firms "also"? Idiot.
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Like +0 Object -1 Anon123908 07 Apr 16, 19:55
Hey, what authority do you even have to speak on behalf of other people? People must be free to dress the way they want to. Please do not impose your standards of morality on other people. That is their personal spheres. You are not invited to tell anyone about anything concerning their lives. Thanks
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Like +0 Object -1 Bored Graduate 07 Apr 16, 20:03
To you Sir, I can only quote the inimitable Archie Aymslowe, President of the F.A.R.T movement, "I'm not putting them on. I like a healthy breeze around my privates, thanks."
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Like +1 Object -0 R Venkat Rao 07 Apr 16, 19:32
Please keep me out of this mess :P
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Like +4 Object -8 Guest 07 Apr 16, 20:04
I am definitely not from NLS, but a NLU grad and a student of Nagaraj sir, so I believe I can surely profess my opinion on this point.

As far as I know Nagaraj sir, I am of very certain opinion that he would have intended that way. He is being taken wrongly. There is whole lot of other side of this story which needs investigation.I would love if legally India comes up with that part as well. I have been scolded many a times by nagaraj sir, but he never shames anyone. Rather than entering into such debates there is always a better way of solving these problems and issues. Country never works through protest.
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Like +4 Object -1 Lol 07 Apr 16, 23:06
So are you doing damage control for him? is he paying you? Do you wear shorts when you're around him?
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30.2
Like +6 Object -0 Bored Graduate 08 Apr 16, 01:06  interesting
Here's the nub of it, we get damn prissy about calling a spade a spade. Read the text of what he is supposed to have said. It takes a special kind of blindness not to see the reeking misogyny and slut shaming in those comments. You cannot get away with claiming lack of mens rea when you make such statements. What do you think you are intending to say, when you say 'You can come to class without a dress also. That is how your character is, I’m going to ignore you'

Fact of the matter is that if you back down and let the apologists get away with it with the most ridiculous excuses like 'Oh! I didn't mean it!, I say the same to boys a swell!, I only wanted to enforce discipline!' You are appeasing Slut Shaming and Sexual Harassment.

I am noticing that the third year batch is backing down, and saying stuff like we don't want to make an accusation and want an inquiry to determine and such levels of malarky. Stay strong, and call a spade a spade, if no one makes the accusation, then the Professor has no charge to answer.

If you are still not convinced and what to give this Professor more rope (preferably to hang himself with), Please think, is a Professor who does not 'understand' or know how harmful words can be and is so full of his being a senior professor that he can't recognise sexual harassment (when he himself commits it), a Professor who should be teaching in the 'No.1' Law School in India!

Fight the good fight and remains strong, no matter what the idiots say. NLS is an important institution, which should at the very least ensure that women students aren't slut shamed inside class rooms.
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Like +4 Object -0 ABC123 08 Apr 16, 01:06
Funny how "National" Law School only has faculty members from the south. Kian you should do a report and see which NLU has a truly national faculty. Prob NLUD.
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Like +1 Object -0 Lol 08 Apr 16, 10:49
OMGOMGOMG Times of India did a story http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bengaluru/NLSIU-professor-shames-girl-over-shorts-students-up-in-arms/articleshow/51735452.cms
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Like +1 Object -0 kianganz 08 Apr 16, 10:52
So did Huffington Post today: http://www.huffingtonpost.in/2016/04/07/nagaraj-shorts-moral-policing_n_9632180.html
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Like +1 Object -0 123F 08 Apr 16, 13:48
Well done Kian. You have got your mojo back. MSM is covering stoties after you break them first! You have made a strong comeback after a period when Bar & Bench was overtaking you.
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Like +3 Object -0 kianganz 08 Apr 16, 14:08
Thanks, but nonsense - overtaking? Bah. :) We may have slowed down a bit but in the last 6 months or so...
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32.2
Like +6 Object -1 Faff 08 Apr 16, 11:36  interesting
Unfortunately, they seem to be twisting the protest slightly.

They make it seem like we're an irate bunch of students fighting for our right to wear shorts. Incorrect. We KNOW we have the right to dress as we please; this institution has made that very clear. And the institution, its legacy and culture are much greater than one professor who is offended by our casual dressing style. Our right of wearing weather appropriate clothes (Bangalore is seeing its hottest year) is not being challenged by the University itself.

What is being protested, is the professor's remarks which denigrate the character of a girl just because of the length of her shorts. You're essentially saying, your class participation, thoughts etc don't matter, skimpy clothes means you deserve to be labelled shameless and your presence in this class is unnecessary.
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Like +3 Object -1 Bored Graduate 08 Apr 16, 11:53
Keep up the pressure and don't back down from just demands. Ensure that the correct view is disseminated, especially the text of the Professor's statement. We all know what the institution is like, they will try their best to suppress it and the SBA is a fickle beast, which usually wilts under the slightest pressure. So be wary, be brave and don't let bullies and misogynists get away.
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Like +3 Object -1 Lol 08 Apr 16, 11:51
HuffPost mentioned LI. The comments in the Toi article really show you what's wrong with india. Sick.
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Like +4 Object -0 College is not Home 08 Apr 16, 12:28
Casting aspersions on someone's character based on what he or she wears is wrong and completely unacceptable. The professor's choice of words was extremely poor. Having said that, does it not make sense to have some kind of a dress code in college/school/university ...? Just like people have in office or in the army or when they go to a temple? I wouldn't care two hoots what that someone was wearing in a mall or in a night club or while going for a swim! But a college cannot be brought down to a level where say, well, men go about in undergarments (just to take an example from the other sex)! I am not sure a dress code can really be imposed on anyone but this is something where a person needs to use his/her common sense....shorts (whether a girl wears it or a guy) are not appropriate in a college : when one belongs to an institution, one ought to remember there are a lot of people involved (many a lot different but who have as much right to be on campus) - shouldn't their sensibilities also be kept in mind? A dress code would solve this problem....INSIDE COLLEGE. I wouldnt mind if this person were to go about naked outside. Not anyone's business.
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Like +0 Object -2 Change with the Times 09 Apr 16, 00:21
God, read. This protest is specifically about the fact that we DO NOT have a dress code.
Also, as far as I'm concerned, if you're too distracted by my clothing then that is not my problem, it is yours. Maybe if you weren't so oversexualized (or repressed) that shorts inflame you and distract you ...
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Like +5 Object -2 joie de vivre 08 Apr 16, 13:10
It does seem from the article that the things said by the professor were clearly misogynistic; however, I think this is an appropriate moment to have a deeper conversation around the right to wear clothing of one’s choosing in spaces not private. A few points are flagged for a more pointed and worthwhile discussion:

1. Is there a social consensus on the concept of appropriate attire, if not its contents? – Well, I won’t go to my grandfather’s funeral in swimming trunks and certainly not to a pool party in a three piece suit. So, in a sense we as individuals do have an understanding of the far posts of appropriateness of attire.

2. Is this a women’s issue? – Notwithstanding the present case, I don’t think it is. In other law schools for instance guys wearing shorts have been asked to leave the class. So, it is not a matter that only affects women students, though one must concede that when it does concern them it comes with a certain amount of value judgment.

3. What is the breadth of the right to wear clothing of one’s choosing? – Strictly speaking the law allows one to wear anything short of being naked, which is punishable under the IPC. However, we know that this is not the way how the above right actually plays out. A case in point is the strict guidelines that law firms issue to new recruits on grooming and attire. One would be surprised as to how detailed such HR manuals can be – some even go so far as to state the size of the nose pin! And the fact is most Associates abide by it quite fastidiously even though they may not like it. So, the natural question would be whether the right to wear clothing of one’s choosing can be circumscribed contractually? And if so, can the same be done by a university?

4. Can a professor raise objections to certain type of attire in classrooms without his motivation being “moral policing”? – Now for instance, if I have a job interview – even though the job may be with an NGO that counts turtle eggs – I would still prefer trousers to shorts. However, on the other hand I would happily wear shorts to class. So, why do we see differential reactions to somewhat similar choices? The answer to this is simple: the importance that I accord to a job interview is any day greater than a class lecture as a job interview has a more material impact on my life as opposed to a class lecture, which for most of us is merely a daily ritual. Therefore, can a professor legitimately raise an objection to the casualness of my attire (wearing of shorts) as emblematic of the lack of importance I accord to class lectures and as an extension the class room as a space for learning?
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Like +6 Object -3 Bored Graduate 08 Apr 16, 14:38
Dear joie de vivre,

Once you concede that what the Professor said was misogynistic, there really is no scope for any further pontification. As has been made clear over and over again, the issue is not about 'Dress Code'. A Professor has the right i suppose to exclude whomsoever from their class, if the the said person is in violation of rules of decorum etc. In this case the Professor concedes there is no such rule, so the exclusion was wrong, thereafter he has made remarks that are completely unacceptable and unconscionable, hence the protest.

If you want to canvass for a 'Dress Code' please go ahead, but don't use a Professor's 'slut shaming' as your spring board. And to your point about this not being a woman's issue. I am sorry but it sure as hell is. When a male student is excluded from class for wearing shorts, it is rare that it is accompanied by the innuendo of promiscuity or sexual deviance, let alone a full blown assault on the character of the student in this case.

NLSIU administration may impose whatever Dress Code it wants, it would be a stupid move, but this protest is not about a dress code, its about why a Woman's dress is used to launch attacks of sexual deviance and innuendo against her and why this is wrong.
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Like +1 Object -0 Faff 08 Apr 16, 17:37
The social consensus deems shorts appropriate. Believe it or not, there are nobody drooling or lecherously gazing at the show of legs. As someone else commented, they're worn for comfort, not for show. This summer is too hot for full length jeans. It's that simple.
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Like +4 Object -2 Nidiot 08 Apr 16, 13:42
In this thread - lots of people who seem to think people in National Law Schools "dress" for class. We do not. It's not a sign of disrespect it's comfortable to wear shorts because we're all college students. Nagaraj seems to have made it a gender issue all on his own. Peace.
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Like +5 Object -0 Gueeest 08 Apr 16, 13:51  interesting
Great job LI. This is all over the media: Hindu, Asian Age, Quint etc.
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Like +3 Object -0 In Awe 08 Apr 16, 13:54
Well done to the students. All NLUs should take a lesson from this. In most NLUs students lack unity and are insecure. Will we see students at other places showing some guts?
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Like +1 Object -0 Q 08 Apr 16, 17:00
Media worldwide reporting on NLSIU shorts incident, but Bar & Bench silent as it was Legally India's scoop. Very unprofessional and small-minded.
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39.1
Like +5 Object -0 kianganz 08 Apr 16, 17:05  interesting
In their defence I don't think it's that bad, they could just be busy on something else at the moment, as happens in journalism, plus they might feel there's little point in covering it now that pretty much everyone in the legal fraternity and outside knows about it anyway.

Also, they've been quite decent over the last year or so in acknowledging our scoops, as we do theirs, which is a nice kind of friendly rivalry to have in this space, so no need to be too harsh in this case.
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Like +0 Object -0 Lol 08 Apr 16, 19:40
here's a poll. you know what to do guys.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Poll-on-professor-comment-on-shorts/polls/51743273.cms
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Like +4 Object -0 JobDoneRight 08 Apr 16, 19:58
That moment when you realize Kian's article is better than any other in the MSM...
This is the only source which actually explains the incident. Others seem more interested in misrepresenting the scenario by putting up pictures of girls in shorts in other locations which really have no resemblance to Ground Zero situation...
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Like +0 Object -0 Guest-D 09 Apr 16, 08:50
Look at this Kian: Firstpost did a story but quoted Quint before LI, even though Quint took it from you

http://www.firstpost.com/india/nlsiu-prof-slut-shames-law-student-for-wearing-shorts-classmates-protest-by-showing-up-to-class-in-shorts-2719142.html
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Like +0 Object -0 LOL nagaraj 09 Apr 16, 12:24
OMG this story is the TOP HEADLINE in Firstpost right now. NLS is being called a Khap Panchayat. This is probably the most coverage MSM has given to an LI scoop. But shame that the BCI corruption story is not being picked by MSM.

http://www.firstpost.com/india/nls-prof-slut-shaming-student-in-shorts-is-not-surprising-it-shows-how-indias-premier-law-school-behaves-like-a-khap-panchayat-2720450.html
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Like +2 Object -0 kianganz 09 Apr 16, 13:41
Hehe, I completely agree, it feels like it's being blown out of proportion by the MSM just a little bit - NLSIU is far from a Khap Panchayat. MSM hates doing the difficult stories unfortunately... :(
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Like +1 Object -0 kianganz 09 Apr 16, 13:42
:)

At least Firstpost mentioned LI; TOI is generally the worst offender. They nearly never ever mention any other publication.
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Like +0 Object -0 Please report this 09 Apr 16, 12:36
An NLS alum has blown the lid on the shocking behaviour by faculty and admin that happens there. All this needs to come out, and we need to have a serious discussion on how the best students are taught and governed by a bunch of idiots. This is true for all law schools. I urge you to interview Amita Dhanda, Shamnad, Sudhir and others and seek their views on why the quality of faculty and admin is so poor at premier NLUs. Why are alumni not teaching??. We need to start a movement to improve things!
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Like +0 Object -1 Please report this 09 Apr 16, 12:37
http://www.firstpost.com/india/nls-prof-slut-shaming-student-in-shorts-is-not-surprising-it-shows-how-indias-premier-law-school-behaves-like-a-khap-panchayat-2720450.html
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Like +3 Object -0 kianganz 09 Apr 16, 14:08
Interesting article. What's most hilarious however, is that from what I can tell, none of the the 722 commenters on the article (to date) seem to have read the article.

A third seems to be about Sharia law, another third about how much they hate Modi, and another third about how Cong and AAP are corrupt.

Brilliant. :)
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Like +0 Object -5 Guest 09 Apr 16, 16:39
Professor's intention wasn't wrong,he might have been a bit harsh but the point which he wanted 2 say was right.
We should not get influenced by western culture. Women should b given protection. 1 of the aspects of protection is also the protection against the propaganda I.e going on in the society that if girls don't wear western clothing & mingle with boys then they r termed as old- fashioned,low standard, backward mentality etc. This must b stopped at all cost.
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Like +0 Object -0 TOI Commentor 09 Apr 16, 22:37
Bhai please put these comments in the TOI Article Page where they belong
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Like +0 Object -1 Guest. 10 Apr 16, 08:24
Kian the claims made in the firstpost story are very serious and shocking. Can you imagine this happening at Harvard or Oxford? You must do an expose on this.
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Like +2 Object -0 Yo 10 Apr 16, 12:37
The claims made were utter bullshit. Comparing students waiting for consults to subaltern castes? WTF.
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