The Increasing Diversity by Increasing Access (IDIA) initiative, which aims to help students from non-traditional lawyer backgrounds to apply to national law schools, has fund-raised Rs 72 lakhs at an event in Delhi on Saturday attended by 150.

IDIA founder Shamnad Basheer said that donors had pledged Rs 12 lakh in donations, which would be used to support the ongoing activites of IDIA.

On top of that, three lawyers had committed to fund the tuition fees for four IDIA scholars' five-year degrees, each running to Rs 3 lakhs per year, at an aggregate five-year cost of Rs 60 lakh.

Supporters will be able to choose scholars to sponsor from a pool selected by IDIA.

Basheer said that IDIA's first annual conference, held at NLU Delhi during the day and at the Constitutional Club in the evening for an awards ceremony, hosted some very interesting discussion and participation.

Dr G Mohan Gopal, director of the Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies, held a "pretty provocative address", explained Basheer. "He said, you [IDIA] should aim to be redundant, which is actually fabulous."

"It is an interesting sentiment that your larger vision should be to be redundant and, more importantly, the model as it stands now is about one-sided help to the scholars, but it should also be about what scholars can teach you because they come from communities [with things to share]."

Basheer said that IDIA had already tried to incorporate "learning from the entire group" into its programme but would do more of this.

Around 150 lawyers, academics and supporters attended the event, said Basheer, including managing partners from India's largest law firms, in-house counsel, and academics.

At a function in the evening, IDIA also awarded prizes to IDIA supporters and singled out scholars for recognition as CHAMPS - an acronym for fostering lawyers who are "creative", "holistic", altruistic", "mavericks" and "problem solvers".

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Like +2 Object -7 Dazed and Confused 05 May 14, 14:41
People seem quite comfortable with age discrimination in legal education. Has IDIA been clear about its definition of "diversity"? What are the criteria for becoming an eligible "pool scholar" identified as fund worthy by the IDIA? Perhaps a few links in the story might help - one hopes that IDIA has clarified this somewhere. It would be interesting to see who IDIA picks - any mothers, any older people, anyone with working class experience? Or just youngsters from "lower strata" the IDIA folks deem worthy of assistance.
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1.1
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Like +4 Object -2 kianganz 05 May 14, 15:43
Hi - I think IDIA is targeting kids for the most parts right now - not sure if this will change anytime soon though.

They do have lots of information on their website:
http://idialaw.com/

And we've written about IDIA a fair bit in the past too under the following tags:
http://www.legallyindia.com/tag/idia
http://www.legallyindia.com/tag/increasing-diversity-by-increasing-access-idia
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1.2
Like +9 Object -1 Ghonshu Patel 05 May 14, 16:30  interesting
Quoting Dazed and Confused:
People seem quite comfortable with age discrimination in legal education. Has IDIA been clear about its definition of "diversity"? What are the criteria for becoming an eligible "pool scholar" identified as fund worthy by the IDIA? Perhaps a few links in the story might help - one hopes that IDIA has clarified this somewhere. It would be interesting to see who IDIA picks - any mothers, any older people, anyone with working class experience? Or just youngsters from "lower strata" the IDIA folks deem worthy of assistance.


Your tone in last sentence. I don't likes.
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1.3
Like +11 Object -2 IDIA Team Member 05 May 14, 18:39  interesting
Hi Dazed,

As IDIA is constrained by the age-limits that the National Law Universities impose for those who write the entrance exams, we cannot choose most 'mothers, any older people, anyone with working class experience'.

IDIA does choose youngsters from lower strata which we deem worthy of assistance. If you may explain why lower strata has been put in quotes, we'll be glad to clarify what exactly your concern is.
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1.3.1
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Like +0 Object -5 Dazed and Confused 07 May 14, 13:35
My primary answer is below at 6.3.

Basically, while much of IDIA's work seems laudable, it is playing a very small game, which is an occasion for sadness when such otherwise interesting people are involved in it. This seems like a JNU sort of project. Very timid, ideological, and ultimately, very safe.

Your phrase says a lot: "IDIA does choose youngsters from the lower start we deem worthy of assistance." That phrase has more than a whiff of class arrogance about it - how nice of you to reach down and help those less fortunate! One has to do one's best, after all, no?

There are plenty of well established organizations, such as Rotary or the Lions, who very effectively dole out and monitor expenditure on education for the very people you are targeting. If IDIA leveraged these existing organizations they could easily reach a very broad sample of the population they hope to target, and not have to reinvent the wheel. IDIA couldl provide tutoring and other guidance while the Rotary or Lions could provide the network for reaching candidates, auditing fund dispersal and monitoring progress, none of which IDIA is likely to do as well compared with a mature and time-tested organization.

So this strikes me as a very narrow, pedestrian way for a few "leading lights" to work off their noblesse oblige. One can acknowledge and applaud whatever good they will accomplish while also noting that the profession has yet to produce a movement for genuine, broad-based diversity in the law school population.
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1.3.1.1
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Like +2 Object -0 guest 07 May 14, 14:05
they are doing their bit. If you are dissatisfied, why not start your own initiative and fill in your identified gap.
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1.3.1.1...
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Like +4 Object -3 Rodin 07 May 14, 15:11
Thats a fair point... but the thing is that IDIA typically corners so much of the publicity that there is little room left for other (more focused) initiatives to get traction- I speak from experience. Partly this is because of the fact that some of the trustees of IDIA run it as a personal fiefdom and love being in the limelight at every given opportunity (thus the almost limitless publicity in the legal press). Frankly no one has done a critical assessment of what IDIA has achieved. For example, was it really necessary to have a program with 150 participants in two venues. Who bore the cost? Could this cost not have been better utilised in helping a needy person? Does IDIA effectively assist students in obtaining the various Government scholarships that are already available or does it rely on the feel good sentiment of a few law firm partners? These are genuine issues which need to be raised, but no one is raising them.
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1.4
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Like +2 Object -1 bk 06 May 14, 15:55
why do you whine so much about every good initiative that somebody else takes!!!
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1.4.2
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Like +2 Object -4 Dazed and Confused 07 May 14, 13:37
Encouraging someone to aim higher is not whining. Applauding a C+ when someone is capable of an A does not do anyone any favors.
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1.5
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Like +2 Object -1 Dipto 08 May 14, 18:32
Hi

These are good questions and some that we are asked often by our supporters as well as people who do not have much information about the scholars we have picked so far or are in the process of training. Allow me to first address your question on what we consider as diversity and how we aim to foster it.
When we speak about diversity in law schools and work towards bringing a set of candidates who would help increase diversity, we consider the economic disadvantage to be the primary consideration(since that is the single largest access bottleneck to law schools). However, most of our students are also socially disadvantaged by virtue of hailing from communities that have been historically and socially marginalized i.e. Sc's and St's, the differently-abled. The diversity component is further enhanced by the fact that these students hail from some of the most disconnected and remote parts of the states that they represent - Sunderbans in West Bengal, Gudemaranahalli in Karnataka, villages in Machhilipatnam, Kurnool and Nellore in Andhra Pradesh, Rae Bareily in Uttar Pradesh, Phagwara in Punjab, Barmer in Rajasthan, Pitij in Jharkhand, Chhinga Weng in Mizoram, Kollam in Kerala and L. Gamnom in Manipur. You would know that students in remote areas have extremely limited access to information about viable career options or even higher education opportunities as such and therefore, lack of access to information is another bottleneck that we try to address. Most of our scholars belong to families run by farmers, quarry workers, roadside tea and newspaper vendors, clerks, drivers and pani puri karts etc. Please do visit our website to catch a glimpse of the detailed profiles of these students.
To be 'fund worthy' therefore, a candidate has to demonstrate economic disadvantage as the foremost criteria and that coupled with aptitude for law and/or any other experience/condition that makes him/her socially disadvantaged. Essentially the child should, by virtue of the gender, place of birth, social position, economic ability, life experience etc enhance diversity in the classroom he/she eventually attends in future.

Age Bar and the IDIA pool of scholars: While we have, at several forums and at every opportunity that we had, recorded our protests against the age bar mandated under CLAT, you would appreciate that it is ultimately the CLAT Committee that alone decides on the policies, unless one approaches the court to challenge the policy and decide on the matter. So long as the age bar remains, we have to prepare our scholars who have crossed the upper limit of age, for other leading law colleges, such as GLC, ILS, IP University and sometimes even 3 year law courses. One such scholar is above 21, a mother of a child who is differently abled and supports the family by working as a domestic help. She is being trained by us to appear for law entrance examinations that she is eligible to appear for. I am not very sure about what you mean by 'working class experience' but we support scholars who were previously working as newspaper vendor, domestic help, courier delivery boy, data entry agent at truck loading stations. And we are extremely proud that each of them have, through immense hard work and grit, secured seats at the various national law schools in India.
As we move forward, we are trying to address all aspects of diversity in the best possible manner and striving to bring those meritorious students into law schools who would have otherwise never had the opportunity or means to attend one. Hoping that you would connect us to such students in case you do know anyone worthy of our support and help us spread the word about our objectives.
Thanks for taking out so much time to ponder over these issues and engage with us in a fruitful discussion.
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1.5.3
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Like +0 Object -0 Dazed and Confused 09 May 14, 11:24
That is a very enlightening and responsive answer and very much welcome. Thank you.
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Like +9 Object -0 Law school-ite 05 May 14, 16:21  interesting
Kian, please continue to report about the IDIA and support it in any manner possible for you!
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Like +7 Object -1 Fantastic 05 May 14, 18:03  interesting
Absolutely fantastic initiative.
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Like +20 Object -1 Ramanuj 05 May 14, 18:42  interesting  top rated
72 lakhs sound like a lot of money, but considering that IDIA is helping 20-30 students a year, it is literally nothing. The expenses will soon cross crores every year if any decent scale is to be achieved. I wish you highlighted these factors along with the amount raised, because otherwise donors may be misled to think IDIA already has a lot of money.
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Like +8 Object -0 Charity 05 May 14, 19:12  interesting
The legal community has started giving back. However a lot more personal contributions and institutional support is required to grow this.
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Like +2 Object -4 Thinkmore 05 May 14, 19:45
Undoubtedly this is a well intentioned initiative, but Dazed has a fair point here. IDIA seems to be happy with the law school entrance as it is. In fact it might have legitimized it. There was a time when many were speaking of changing the entrance exam patterns. It was urban-centric, english-centric, and did not test relevant aptitudes. However IDIA collaborated with the very people who had an interest in the entrance exam system. Though the initiative has helped select individual students to enter the law schools, too much focus on IDIA has taken the focus off reforming the entrance exams in general. Such highly educated people are involved in the initiative that they can make an impact on how the exams should be reformed. As of now it is a form of charity that will not have any large scale impact on equal opportunities for Indian students to enter India's elite law schools. Quick fixes are always welcome, and it might also give a feel good feeling to those involved. The individual students who benefit will of course go through a life-changing experience. But it also means that the public institutions of India, including the law schools remain unchanged. No serious questions asked.
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6.1
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Like +3 Object -1 IDIA Alumni 06 May 14, 12:08
While the points raised might be valid, fact is IDIA has a dedicated team of researchers who work on the policy issues concerning Legal Educations in India. Not only has there been consultation about the same with leading academics and industry experts, but certain working papers have also been formulated. There have also been representations before the CJI and BCI along with other prominent members of the judiciary. So, the focus has not gone off examination reforms, rather a more concerted effort is being undertaken for the same.
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6.2
Like +5 Object -1 bk 06 May 14, 15:59
IDIA is not taking up a fight against the system because that is not within its mandate ! Everybody can't jump into every sphere of what is wrong with the world. IF you want to protest about the format of the entrance exam start a cohort and do it. Don't complain about why an organisation with a clear limited mandate should also do it. If you are so interested in becoming part of IDIA decision making you are welcome to become a sponsor or an administrative member and then talk. Don't waste time posting anonymously from your comfortable office about things other people are doing !. I am so sick of the negative attitude everybody has all the time. Get out of the law school classroom and into the real world for once.
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6.2.1
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Like +1 Object -3 Thinkmore 07 May 14, 12:54
Your anger and frustration demonstrates why you dont want to think more. You start by making a few points and then end up all rhetorical. Analogous example of the point I am making: in India's struggle for independence some people did not want to fight for self rule. They were happy to strike a deal with the colonial government and take small concessions. Other leaders opposed this and slowly there was a demand for self-determination. Also, in the anti-corruption movement in India today major political parties are happy to make small amendments to the law that will not address the problem. The AAP and others however are fighting for real change because they are serious about what they are doing. I am not saying that IDIA is not well-intentioned, only that it is shallow thinking. In effect it has ended up strengthening the hands of the discriminatory system that we have. Remember its relationship with Rainmaker? IDIA works closely with tutorial centers who have a vested interest in keeping this system of entrances alive. So my counsel to you, hotheaded bk, is think more.
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6.3
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Like +2 Object -7 Dazed and Confused 06 May 14, 16:07
Exactly! The IDIA folks are doing good things, no doubt. But their initiatives show a rather timid, institutional mindset rather than a bold re-think of the role lawyers can play in society, and who should have an opportunity to participate. Perpetuating age discrimination at national law schools, for instance, is hardly a promising strategy for increasing "diversity." The IDIA initiative is a very middle class idea of what constitutes equal access to the profession, and their approach to dealing with power is similarly hat-in-hand.

If they simply tweak the inflow filtered through a discriminatory system, they will not have done much at all. But of course, they are at least "doing something." Unfortunately, that counts for bold thinking in today's scene.
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6.3.2
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Like +2 Object -1 IDEA 08 May 14, 23:21
Can't agree more. If this is bold thinking then our standards have surely plummeted. Equal access is a real problem for our law schools. IDIA surely will not change anything. Its like a private scholarship. I hope reading these comments will make them think about the real issue they are dealing with.
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Like +4 Object -1 Clarity 05 May 14, 20:02
Just a few clarifications.
The money raised is not actually 72 lakhs, though it would have been absolutely brilliant had it been so. It actually includes the total amount pledged by people in an informal capacity as student scholarships in the future years. Hopefully most of them will materialize to help scholars in the future years. Considering each NLU student requires approximately 3 lakhs annually and IDIA supports over 40 students now, with an addition of 10 nearly every year, the amount is not much though. Hopefully more and more people will extend their support to this great cause.
About the age limit, IDIA can only help those whom the law schools won't actually disqualify on grounds apart from merit or economy. Having said that, at least one student being trained is a young mother and domestic help, so obviously they don't close doors on anyone who is willing to strive hard.
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7.1
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Like +2 Object -0 gg 07 May 14, 14:35
Idiot - the money raised in actually 72 lacs. What is the difference if the money is pledged or the money is lying in IDIA's bank account? The money will be made available when needed
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Like +1 Object -3 max 07 May 14, 15:20
IDIA seems to have a dedicated band of people to respond to LI. Guess thats what their "Directors" do...
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8.1
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Like +3 Object -0 kianganz 07 May 14, 15:30
Wow, people are really bitchy about IDIA.

Personally, I don't see what's so bad about it - would love people to explain if they actually have a cogent argument.

Is there an issue with the current demographic mix of undergrad students entering the law?

Are there any other initiatives that try to address this problem?

I remember that there are a bunch of schemes in the UK with similar aims at several different levels. One for instance, encourages students from non-top universities to apply to law firms, etc, since kids at OxBridge and other top unis tend to have a massive public school bias (public, weirdly, meaning 'private' in the UK) and get ignored by most recruiters.

Likewise, most top universities also have at least one programme to encourage kids from state schools (i.e., non-private schools) to apply to Oxford to try and address the imbalance. And I'm sure there are a bunch of national schemes too.

I think every initiative is obviously limited in what it can achieve, but you need to set yourself boundaries and realistic targets also so that at least you can achieve what you set out and not succumb to mission creep.

That said, what IDIA is trying to achieve seems worthwhile.

I think what really needs to happen though is that colleges waive at least some of the fees or establish their own scholarships so that meeting IDIA scholars' fees isn't contingent on IDIA going around with a begging bowl every year, which can't be sustainable if it's scaled... Not sure if NLSes are allowed to do that under their governing statutes?
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8.1.1
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Like +3 Object -6 Dazed and Confused 07 May 14, 18:09
The IDIA initiative is like a nice bowl of tomato soup. Very good and all that, but you see the chefs standing there waiting for applause, and you wonder, "These are Chefs? They want applause for tomato soup?" By all means, awfully nice soup. Now, run along to your conferences and give yourselves awards for "giving back."
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8.1.1.1
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Like +0 Object -0 Fantastic 07 May 14, 21:12
Quoting Dazed and Confused:
The IDIA initiative is like a nice bowl of tomato soup. Very good and all that, but you see the chefs standing there waiting for applause, and you wonder, "These are Chefs? They want applause for tomato soup?" By all means, awfully nice soup. Now, run along to your conferences and give yourselves awards for "giving back."

Sounds like a really Dazed and Confused comment!
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8.1.1.2
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Like +4 Object -1 Ghonshu Patel 08 May 14, 15:09
First you are critical. Then in 1.4.2 you say you are actually encouraging and applauding. After that you say IDIA is like tomato soup. All this, I don't likes. Make up your mind.

It is easy to sit on a high chair and pass comments. Ask your maid servant what she will do if she has extra money. She will say that she will use it for her child's education. Ask your night watchman why he works in two shifts. He will also say that he wants to educate his children. Effectively, IDIA is not just helping children but their parents also.

Quoting Dazed and Confused:
The IDIA initiative is like a nice bowl of tomato soup. Very good and all that, but you see the chefs standing there waiting for applause, and you wonder, "These are Chefs? They want applause for tomato soup?" By all means, awfully nice soup. Now, run along to your conferences and give yourselves awards for "giving back."
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8.1.1.2...
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Like +0 Object -1 IDEA 08 May 14, 23:27
Dear Ghonchu Patel, Can you please tell me what are the reasons for the problems of access, and lack of diversity in Indian law schools? What do you think is the way to do away with those problems in a permanent way? I dont have a maid 'servant' (ouch, domestic helper I guess) but I know that deprived sections of society value education. But what if your domestic helper became an IDIA scholar and your friends could not even after wanting to be. I guess there are millions like that, so wont they feel bad if some are selectively chosen and not others. They might think that its all right if one is helped instead of none, but I am sure they will be happier if the privileged sections thought about and acted for policies that will bring in institutional reform instead of cherry-picking ones.
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8.1.1.2...
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Like +3 Object -1 Ghonshu Patel 09 May 14, 09:55
Are you trying to say that every initiative should be all inclusive, and if it cannot be - then it should not even take off? I don't likes that idea.

Quoting IDEA:
Dear Ghonchu Patel, Can you please tell me what are the reasons for the problems of access, and lack of diversity in Indian law schools? What do you think is the way to do away with those problems in a permanent way? I dont have a maid 'servant' (ouch, domestic helper I guess) but I know that deprived sections of society value education. But what if your domestic helper became an IDIA scholar and your friends could not even after wanting to be. I guess there are millions like that, so wont they feel bad if some are selectively chosen and not others. They might think that its all right if one is helped instead of none, but I am sure they will be happier if the privileged sections thought about and acted for policies that will bring in institutional reform instead of cherry-picking ones.
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8.1.2
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Like +0 Object -3 IDEA 08 May 14, 23:14
There is no objection to having diversity programmes. The problem seems to be with one that is fighting a fruitless battle. It is trying to bring diversity by playing the very game that stops real diversity from happening in the future. The entrance exam pattern, and content is exclusionary. IDIA helps some non-privileged students by training them how to tackle the exclusionary exam. More worrying is the fact that it works closely with those with vested monetary interests in the exams: tutorial centers. If IDIA is concerned about diversity issues, then I urge them to dissociate themselves from tutorial centers and start a campaign to change the content of the exam. And to those who are advising the critics to do something themselves, there have been at least two efforts, on by my own teachers, to change the exam pattern. Of course they were not busy gaining popularity for it. But as with many other initiatives, the deep and serious challenges were ignored and since the task was difficult, not many people took it up. It was not a glamorous job. It needed hard thinking, long term policy change and gathering of support. Most people were not interested in the law schools. Students were career minded, teachers not bothered. But when it came to doing something that was easy, and that did not pose a challenge to anyone, lots joined it. This is a story of contemporary India reflected in the law schools. But not to worry, the serious challenges take time and will re-emerge. Will be interesting to see how IDIA directors react to that. The challenge will be that make it impossible for people to get into law schools just by coaching. Test real aptitudes, in regional languages as well. No more money-making in the name of entrance exams.
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8.1.2.3
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Like +2 Object -1 Dazed and Confused 09 May 14, 07:57
How uncomfortably perceptive and fact based! Are you deliberately trying to make people think more deeply about the issue? Sir/madam, that marks you as a complainer, I am sorry to say. Please, if you don't love my India with eyes closed and mouth shut, go to phoren.
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8.1.3
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Like +2 Object -2 max 09 May 14, 05:32
I think the reason people are bitchy about IDEA are self evident. Yes, its a great initiative, but it receives a much greater amount of the limelight than it deserves because of its tendency to relentlessly publicize itself, you don't see that in a Pratham or a Teach for India...
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8.1.3.4
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Like +2 Object -0 kianganz 09 May 14, 05:52
I don't think in the mainstream press IDIA gets any more coverage (if any) than any other NGO.

On Legally India, yes, we write about IDIA often for obvious reasons: it's an NGO started by lawyers for lawyers rather recently, and it seems to be doing good work and readers seem to be reading it.

If your worst criticism of IDIA is that it receives too much limelight then you are, possibly intentionally, missing the fire and only seeing the smoke (if that works as a metaphor)?
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Like +1 Object -2 gg 07 May 14, 15:55
All said and done, IDIA is trying to make a difference. And their "directors" are supporting and working for IDIA for no monetary or other considerations.

If you cannot support IDIA, and you want to oppose IDIA / level allegations against it...at least substantiate
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9.1
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Like +1 Object -1 max 07 May 14, 22:07
Is it true that idia directors are not paid? I had heard otherwise
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Like +2 Object -1 IDIA Director 08 May 14, 15:38
Dear All,

If you were present at the IDIA Delhi Conference, you would have noticed that law firm partners, senior lawyers and even judges were addressed by children from marginalized economic background. Some of these IDIA scholars were disabled. How many times have you seen such things happen? How such scholars will get to tell their stories to the who's who of the legal fraternity? I have never seen it happen before. We need our scholars to rub shoulders with the top people in the sector so that they understand what they can make out of themselves. At the same time, we need the law firm partners, senior lawyers and judges to hear about the ground realities from the people who know about it from their personal experiences. These events also help in creating awareness. I remember, a top firm partner asked us how they can make their office disabled friendly and a visually impaired IDIA scholar told him what they had to do.

IDIA runs on the contributions made by the people. While NLU Delhi did not charge a dime for holding the conference, the tab for the evening event was picked up by one of the donors. The conference also helped us raise some funds for the future IDIA scholars. We also help our all scholars in getting government and private scholarship. You can confirm the same with any of our 40+ scholars in the various law schools across this country. We need such events to reach out to more people so that we can contribute more. I understand that some of you feel that we can do more. I agree with you completely. But to do that, we need more hands. I urge all of you to help us out. I can assure you that together, we will me a more effective organisation.

Thanks.
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10.1
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Like +2 Object -1 max 09 May 14, 05:27
The point remains that instead of picking up the tab, the donor could have sponsored one more scholar...
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10.1.1
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Like +1 Object -2 Min 09 May 14, 13:17
The point remains that you are completely missing the point about such events attracting more supporters and donors and hence more funding for more scholars than would have been possible by the single donor spending the money for one solitary scholar.
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10.1.1.1
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Like +1 Object -1 max 09 May 14, 16:09
So the only way to get more funds is to throw 150 people extravaganzas- maybe the first thing IDIA needs to do is train its fund raisers
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10.2
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Like +0 Object -0 Dazed and Confused 09 May 14, 07:59
How about a clarification on the assertion above regarding IDIA's ties to test prep centers?
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10.2.2
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Like +1 Object -0 Clarification 09 May 14, 13:13
The only 'tie' that IDIA has with 'test prep centres' is that the latter give away their material to IDIA students free of cost and supplement the coaching of IDIA students free of cost. All IDIA scholars are separately trained by law school student volunteers, catering to their different needs (say, initial lack of proficiency with English etc.) They also need this exposure to these test prep centres, if for nothing else than to interact with the students studying there. That also helps those students to think about the movement and its cause a lot. In fact, many first year student volunteers join IDIA after having met with IDIA scholars while preparing for CLAT.
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Like +1 Object -1 chicken and egg? 09 May 14, 08:13
well if you didn't fund raise, how would you have money to carry on the program? as you know, fund raising is pretty much done by almost every social sector organization. so nothing unusual here. and why do you see it as bad? the money spent on conference and fund raising could at best support one scholar for just one year. but thanks to the conference and fund raising, IDIA can now support at least 4 scholars for 5 years (as per this LI article); and it also manages to spread the word to the legal fraternity who get to interact with scholars and see the work first hand. And get more supporters into the fray. Not a bad thing, me thinks.
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Like +1 Object -0 Further equality 21 May 14, 17:59
I personally believe that this creates further inequality. I am currently in law school and am struggling to find internships. My family background doesnt have anyone who can recommend me somewhere. Now, I have to deal with IDIA also. I have spoken with people and I understand that the IDIA is organising moot sponsorships and internships for their so-called scholars. If they are scholars, let them compete on a level playing field with me. I am slowly believing that its a crime to be borne in this country if you are neither SC/ST/OBC, nor rich nor poor.

Kian - any thoughts?
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