Facebook Twitter Google Email

CLAT 2014: New year, new hopefuls, new CLAT websiteCLAT 2014: New year, new hopefuls, new CLAT websiteThe Common Law Admissions Test (CLAT) to be conducted by GNLU Gandhinagar on 11 May 2014, opened its doors to applicants on 1 January 2014.

The application, which can be completed online entirely, is available on the official www.clat.ac.in website.

The re-designed website contains detailed instructions and promises that “question booklets” containing previous years’ CLAT questions will be available for Rs 250 from the website or from one of the 14 national law schools participating in the CLAT.

This year there are a total of 1,660 undergraduate seats available via CLAT national law schools, of which 436 are reserved for state quotas. A total of 794 seats are available in the general list, according to the website.

Last year 29,500 law aspirants applied to the CLAT, which was a year-on-year increase of 15 per cent.

Read last year’s CLAT preference analysis

Share this: Facebook Twitter Google Email
Related Articles
Click to show 14 comments
at your own risk
(alt+shift+c)

NB: By reading the comments you agree that they are the personal views and opinions of readers, for which Legally India has no liability whatsoever. Because anonymous comments may be biased or unreliable, you agree that you will not allow any comment(s) to affect your estimation of any person(s) or organisation(s). If you believe a comment is inappropriate, please click 'Report to administrator' below the comment with your objection and we will review it as soon as practicable.

reader comments:comments rss feedrefresh

Filter out low-rated comments. Show all comments. Show latest comments only (beta)

1
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -0 Aspirant 2014-01-03 09:50
Seems like GNLU has done a wonderful job in making the application process completely online. Hopefully, the system does not crash due to increased traffic!
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2
 
Show?
Recommend! +2 Objection! -2 Horrible idea 2014-01-03 14:09
The online process is actually not in furtherance of the interest of many aspirants.

It assumes that aspirants in small towns can arrange PDF scans and JPG scans of documents, photographs, signatures, etc.

It also assumes that all aspirants will have computer literacy.

Thus, it is detrimental to many aspirants and against increasing access to legal education. One may even go as afar as to say it is elitist!!

Not to mention that the process has been outsourced to GIPS.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -0 Disagree 2014-01-04 14:07
This notion that small town and village aspirants cannot access internet is wrong. Most of the PSUs and Banks provide for online recruitment.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.1
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -0 Horrible idea 2014-01-06 11:58
Its not a notion - I know the difficulties people are facing. Most city people won’t understand that some small towns or villages may not even have a scanner facility!

Also, lets just hope NLUs don't start functioning like PSUs!!

The CLAT online process is very cumbersome. I have stated reasons why. I have no difficulty using an online process, but many people have difficulties.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.2
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -0 Horrible idea 2014-01-06 12:13
Dear Aspirant

Fisr thing you'll be asked in a mock trial when you make a statement like this is - What's your source for asserting that CAT is cracked in "big number" by people who are actually based in a small town or village (I am not talking of small cities). Do you just think so, or do you have any reliable authority / proof to back you assertion? You may have heard of a dozen people from small backgrounds in IIMs but is that a "big number" as a pecentage?

Note these:

1. Yes, computer literacy is crucial for legal education at the NLUs. But most of us learnt computers after entering lawschool. It is not an eligibility criteria for getting into a NLU. Appreciate that many people come from very small backgrounds and their town/village may not have a scanner facility. Hence my comment.

2. There are entry barriers to various institutions (lawschools, lawfirms, other institutions), both direct and indirect. This online process is an indirect entry barrier for some aspirants who are not as privileged as yourself. You will realize the unjustness of an entry barrier when you face an entry barrier, which mostly act in an elitist manner. CLAT application is elitist in a limited sense, because it inconveniences certain aspirants.

Btw, if you check the IIMs, you'll find very few students from less privileged backgrounds - as a percentage, they are less than people from Tier 1 and 2 cities. Like you, I also do not have any authority for this assertion regarding IIMs, but in case of lawschools, I can tell you from personal exprience that it holds true :)

All the best with CLAT.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
3
 
Show?
Recommend! +2 Objection! -0 Aspirant 2014-01-03 17:35
There is nothing elitist in it. Computer literacy is anyway needed for a good legal education. Nevertheless, many popular exams in India such as CAT and GATE are completely online but people from small cities also crack it in big number.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
3.1
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -0 Horrible idea 2014-01-06 13:02
Dear Aspirant

Fist thing you'll be asked in a mock trial when you make a statement like this is - What's your source for asserting that CAT is cracked in "big number" by people who are actually based in a small town or village (I am not talking of small cities). Do you just think so, or do you have any reliable authority / proof to back you assertion? You may have heard of a dozen people from small backgrounds in IIMs but is that a "big number" as a percentage?

Note these:

1. Yes, computer literacy is crucial for legal education at the NLUs. But most of us learnt computers after entering lawschool. It is not an eligibility criteria for getting into a NLU. Appreciate that many people come from very small backgrounds and their town/village may not have a scanner facility. Hence my comment.

2. There are entry barriers to various institutions (lawschools, lawfirms, other institutions), both direct and indirect. This online process is an indirect entry barrier for some aspirants who are not as privileged as yourself. You will realize the unjustness of an entry barrier when you face an entry barrier, which mostly act in an elitist manner. CLAT application is elitist in a limited sense, because it inconveniences certain aspirants. Also appreciate the age/maturity gap between CLAT and CAT aspirants.

Btw, if you check the IIMs, you'll find very few students from less privileged backgrounds - as a percentage, they are less than people from Tier 1 and 2 cities. Like you, I also do not have any authority for this assertion regarding IIMs, but in case of lawschools, I can tell you from personal experience that it holds true :)

All the best with CLAT.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
4
 
Recommend! +6 Objection! -0 Reservation Observer 2014-01-03 21:34  interesting
Hmmmmm some conclusions on the extent of how reservation is thriving in India as seen from the break up of seats

1) NLSIU, NUJS, NLU Jodhpur and NLU Orissa are the only law colleges with no "state quota"

2) NLU Bhopal, NLU Raipur and NLU Lucknow, NLU Patna and NLU Ranchi are colleges with the highest "state quotas" of 50% seats.

3)NLU Kochi has one of the most detailed break up of reservation (such as for Ezhava, Backward Hindus, Latin Catholic, Kudumbi, etc. )

4) NALSAR is the only college with reservation for women

5) NLU Ranchi is the only college with no reservation for persons with disabilities

6) NLSIU despite having a smaller intake than NALSAR and NLU Bhopal has a much larger general quota.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
4.1
 
Show?
Recommend! +1 Objection! -1 aa 2014-01-03 23:03
you have so much time on your hand, you could almost be a law firm partner
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
4.1.1
 
Show?
Recommend! +1 Objection! -0 kianganz 2014-01-03 23:38
Hmm, I thought it was an interesting analysis...
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
4.1.1.1
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -0 Agree 2014-01-06 11:37
It is indeed an interesting analysis. Very helpful.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
4.1.1.2
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -0 @ Kian 2014-01-06 16:59
Please consider doing a fees analysis if possible? That will be very helpful for indicating the preferences.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
4.1.1.2...
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -0 Fees comparison 2014-01-09 17:43
Here is a fee comparison, which law aspirants may find useful. Among the top NLUs, Hyderabad is the most expensive, followed by Kolkata, Bangalore and Jodhpur.

www.scribd.com/doc/144607907/Law-School-Apps-Educational-Loan
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
5
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -0 Shivam 2014-01-12 12:08
I like the layout and the looks of the website, now for the exam!
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link

Filter out low-rated comments. Show all comments.

Add comment (Alt+Shift+A)

We and fellow readers love when you share your thoughts in a comment but please:
  • be nice to other readers and humans who likely have feelings,
  • use full English sentences and words, and
  • abide by Legally India's full terms and conditions in using the site.