NLU Delhi: Testing entranceNLU Delhi: Testing entrance NLU Delhi’s separate All India Law Entrance Test (AILET) saw almost double the competition compared to 2011 with every candidate fighting 182 others for one of the 72 seats at the law school this year.

However, around 80 candidates are expected to give up a secured seat at the law school once the Common Law Admission Test (CLAT) results are declared two weeks from now.

The law school yesterday declared the results of the sixth edition of AILET that was held on 28 April 2013 and was taken by 12,820 LLB aspirants.

52 candidates cleared the general category cut-off. 11 students made it in the scheduled caste category, including two scholars of the Increasing Diversity by Increasing Access (IDIA) initiative. Five candidates were selected from the scheduled tribes (ST) quota, and two candidates cracked the test under the Persons with Disabilities (PWD) quota.

Ritika Ajitsaria obtained the first rank, scoring 116 out of total 150 marks in the 90 minute test, while the lowest general category score was 100. Scheduled caste (SC) candidates scoring between 90 and 80 marks were selected.

Two IDIA scholars, Priyanka Hazarika with 82 marks and Ramesh Kumar with 80 marks, were ranked 30 and 32 respectively. However, Kumar’s final selection will be subject to him achieving a higher 10+2 board score than two other candidates with the same AILET rank.

The law school will also notify 10 foreign nationals for admission to its LLB program and will provide a copy of the 28 April question paper and answer key on its website on 20 May.

NLU Delhi has also released the first waiting list with 30 candidates scoring 99 and 98 marks. CLAT coaching website CLATGyan told Legally India that in AILET’s previous years all of the first waiting list and most of the second waiting list cleared up for admission. Usually “the top 130/140” ranking candidates have a good chance of making it through to the law school, because high-ranking AILET students opted a CLAT university, explained CLATGyan.

Cut-off marks at the test have decreased in the last two years. The top score at AILET 2012 was 113 marks and the general category list had closed at 99 marks, while in 2011 rank one scored 118 marks and the cut-off for the general category was 105 marks.

AILET was created in 2008 by NLU Delhi separately from the CLAT, which is the unified entrance exam to 14 national law universities and others. The reason behind it was the poor administration of CLAT and the motivation to select students for whom NLU Delhi was not a lower preference, NLU Delhi vice chancellor Ranbir Singh said in 2011. A public interest litigation by lawyer Varun Bhagat around 2006 had resulted in the creation of the CLAT after the Supreme Court directed national law schools to create a joint admissions test.

The sixth CLAT was held on Sunday with around 29,500 candidates appearing for it. Negative marking was introduced for the first time in the exam convened by HNLU Raipur this year. Candidates reported that the level of questions was easy but they struggled with finishing the paper on time. The results will be declared on 31 May.

Relative ease

The approximate competition between candidates to get into NLU Delhi is now roughly comparable to getting into India’s three most popular law schools - NLSIU Bangalore, Nalsar Hyderabad and NUJS Kolkata.

In last year’s CLAT, 266 students out of around 25,732 CLAT takers gained admission to NLSIU, Nalsar and NUJS. Presuming all of them accepted, this worked out to around 1 place at one of those law schools per 97 CLAT students.

If the top 140 AILET students, including waitlists, were to take up one of 72 places at NLU Delhi, the AILET’s competition would be around 1 place for every 90 candidates.

Related Articles
Click to show 20 comments
at your own risk
(alt+shift+c)

NB: By reading the comments you agree that they are the personal views and opinions of readers, for which Legally India has no liability whatsoever. Because anonymous comments may be biased or unreliable, you agree that you will not allow any comment(s) to affect your estimation of any person(s) or organisation(s). If you believe a comment is inappropriate, please click 'Report to administrator' below the comment with your objection and we will review it as soon as practicable.

reader comments:comments rss feedrefresh

Filter out low-rated comments. Show all comments. Show latest comments only (beta)

1
 
Recommend! +12 Objection! -3 Top3 2013-05-16 15:25  interesting
placements similar to clat last 3
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
1.1
 
Show?
Recommend! +3 Objection! -1 Guest 2013-05-16 16:43
Factually incorrect, current day zero placement stands at 12.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
1.2
 
Show?
Recommend! +4 Objection! -2 S 2013-05-16 18:27
You've got to be kidding me! Batch of 2014 has already placed 12 people and 3 people have UK firm internships/vacation schemes!

The performance of our second batch has been better than NLU Jodhpur's 2014 batch. Come on, give us some credit!
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2
 
Show?
Recommend! +5 Objection! -2 Guest 2013-05-16 18:15
and this is a sponsored article...RS is master at playing such games

Kian, and of course u wont publish this one?
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1
 
Recommend! +7 Objection! -0 kianganz 2013-05-16 18:25  interesting
If you have to ask whether we won't be publishing your comment, perhaps you should read this:
www.currybet.net/cbet_blog/2011/09/news-websites-comments-golden-rule.php

Am considering making that part of our official comment moderation policy :)

In any case, no, it's not a sponsored article but I would have hoped for somewhat more intelligent discussion here of the dynamics between a college having its own admissions test and going via CLAT.

It's pretty clear that if NLU D had joined CLAT right from the start, they'd be somewhere in the lower or middle pecking order. But with their own exam, they arguably get much better candidates than through the CLAT.

But would another college, outside of Delhi or with less clout behind it, have managed to make its own admissions test a success (and it's fair to say that the AILET is something of a success, judging by the above figures)?

Orissa and Assam national law schools had their own but quickly ditched those after not getting enough applicants.
www.legallyindia.com/201109282361/Pre-law-student/nlu-orissa-nlu-assam-newbies-to-join-clat-from-next-year

So how did NLU Delhi do it? And should they join CLAT, pursuant to the Supreme Court case? If they joined CLAT next year, where would they slot in, in terms of preferences? Would it begin displacing NUJS or Nalsar or even NLS, just by virtue of its location? Or should NLU Delhi continue AILET?
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.1
 
Recommend! +6 Objection! -2 interesting and top rated 2013-05-17 01:02
Agree with that article, almost entirely. One thing though, I don't think there's anything wrong with correcting people's spellings. Grammar Nazis are critical to the development of society, and comment threads!

On the actual issues, I don't think that there are even 10 kids who choose NLU-D over any of the three colleges you mention. There might be 2 or 3 who pick it over NUJS for city preference reasons, but that doesn't make it "preferred" over NUJS. I think it's clear that the people who do end up at NLU-D are those who did well on the AILET but not on the CLAT. That's an analysis worth doing methinks.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.1.1
 
Show?
Recommend! +4 Objection! -1 kianganz 2013-05-17 01:11
Thanks, agree, we'll definitely try to analyse more on AILET prefs vs Clat, data and resources permitting.

But I do have the suspicion that NLU D would not perform too badly there, probably mostly because of its advantage of being in Delhi where there are more opportunities for internships, guest speakers, interviews, etc, than in probably any other city... Will see if we can find some way to dispel or confirm that suspicion though.

On Grammar Nazis - I agree to some extent, though the risk is that it just turns threads into ad hominem, rather than debates on the merits of the argument itself. Plus, it makes people feel bad and is perhaps not fair considering not everyone's first language is English...
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.1.1...
 
Show?
Recommend! +1 Objection! -1 Godwin law 2013-05-17 09:48
Fair enough, though I think that the well meaning nazis (they exist!) mean it only to improve people, not to make them feel bad.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.1.2
 
Show?
Recommend! +4 Objection! -2 S 2013-05-17 01:29
There are at least 20 kids in the batch of 2016 who left NALSAR or NUJS for NLU Delhi.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.1.2...
 
Show?
Recommend! +2 Objection! -0 Batch of 2014 2013-05-17 10:00
There are 22 kids in class who left NUJS, 2 who left NALSAR and 1 who left NLS.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.1.2...
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -1 Godwin law 2013-05-17 11:08
Name the kid who left NLS? Alternatively, provide his CLAT rank please?
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.1.2...
 
Show?
Recommend! +2 Objection! -0 There you go! 2013-05-17 13:33
Quoting Godwin law:
Name the kid who left NLS? Alternatively, provide his CLAT rank please?

All India Clat rank 8 of 2010, Subro Prokhas Mukherjee.

Also 2010, Karan Chaudhary (SC list) who was in NLS for 2 weeks. got through NLUD second list, left.

This is only from my batch, this increases with everybatch.

We have plenty of NUJS and NALSAR placed CLAT kids there. Me for instance picked NLUD over NUJS. Location works!
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.1.3
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -2 interesting and top rated 2013-05-17 01:47
Quoting interesting and top rated:
Agree with that article, almost entirely. One thing though, I don't think there's anything wrong with correcting people's spellings. Grammar Nazis are critical to the development of society, and comment threads!

On the actual issues, I don't think that there are even 10 kids who choose NLU-D over any of the three colleges you mention. There might be 2 or 3 who pick it over NUJS for city preference reasons, but that doesn't make it "preferred" over NUJS. I think it's clear that the people who do end up at NLU-D are those who did well on the AILET but not on the CLAT. That's an analysis worth doing methinks.


Agreed. But, to add to that - ..or there may be 5 or 6 who pick it over NALSAR for city preference reasons, but again, that doesn't make it "preferred" over NALSAR.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.2
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -0 Guest 2013-05-17 06:20
How they did it?

1. City preference [Huge role]
2. RS Factor [Can't be denied]

But put RS in Assam and surely even he won't be able to replicate this success. So out of those two it will come down to city preference.

Can it displace NLSIU or NALSAR?

Everyone knows the answer to that! Too early to start questioning that hegemony, though if its mooting performances and current year placements are to go by it would be there peer by the time the present first year passes out.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
2.1.3
 
Show?
Recommend! +1 Objection! -0 Confused Zeus Says . . . 2013-05-17 10:15
The story under the first link makes great reading. Very apt.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
3
 
Show?
Recommend! +1 Objection! -1 what? 2013-05-16 18:28
The ratio comparison doesn't make sense. The only correct way to compare is by looking at preferences. The same number of people write the nls and nalsar entrances (the CLAT) and nalsar has less seats. That doesn't mean nls is less sought after than nalsar. Similarly, if the 200th rank on the ailet gets in to nlu Delhi, then any ratio comparison must use 200 as the numerator, not the actual number of seats
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
3.1
 
Show?
Recommend! +2 Objection! -0 kianganz 2013-05-16 18:33
We used 200 as a numerator (or 140 in this case, since the Clatgyan guys helpfully suggested that the top 140 AILETs would get into NLU Delhi).

What we did is say, last year the top 266 Clatters could have got into NLS, Nalsar or NUJS (in roughly that order, and ignoring preferences or some top Clatters who don't take up their offers).

At NLU Delhi, we assumed that since some top Ailet rankers may also rank in Clat and will opt for NLS, say, the top 140 might get into NLU Delhi (despite their only being 72 seats).

The ratios in either case are between 1 in 90-100, meaning purely mathematically, the exams appear to be similarly competitive.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
3.1.1
 
Recommend! +7 Objection! -0 what? 2013-05-17 00:58  interesting
Thanks Kian, that's instructive. My point was also that you shouldn't combine NLS, NALSAR and NUJS, because they're not equal. Most people of the 30000 who write the CLAT have NLS as their first preference. I would, therefore, have 58-60 as my numerator on 30000 for NLS, around 120 (or whatever the last CLAT rank holder to get in to NALSAR is as the numerator for NALSAR, and so on.

Couple of thoughts on this though.

I believe that NLU Delhi is benefitting from an unfair exception in the law. The fact that they would not have received the same students had they been part of the CLAT means that the same is probably true of of NLU Jodhpur, etc., as well (some brilliant kid full of legal aptitude has a bad day at the CLAT, but does well on the other test and ends up at NLU-D). Had all colleges been allowed to have their own tests, they could have all benefitted from this.

I am not sure why they're allowed an exception to the SC ruling. Can you explain?

Also, if its possible (and I don't know if it is), could you, once the CLAT ranks come out, check the CLAT ranks of the successful AILET candidates, and see the lowest/average CLAT ranks of the people who end up at NLU-D? might be useful information.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
4
 
Recommend! +6 Objection! -2 pi 2013-05-16 19:56
we need another varun bhagat to bring nlud to clat fold, completely unnecessary forking of exams.
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link
5
 
Show?
Recommend! +0 Objection! -3 akshay shah 2013-05-17 21:41
My AILET 2013 rank is 38! Du i have any good chance of making it thru?
Reply | Quote | Report to LI | #  link

Filter out low-rated comments. Show all comments.

Add comment (Alt+Shift+A)

We and fellow readers love when you share your thoughts in a comment but please:
  • be nice to other readers and humans who likely have feelings,
  • use full English sentences and words, and
  • abide by Legally India's full terms and conditions in using the site.